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New Publication and Videos Inspired by Farmers Working on Indian Creek Watershed Project

December 17, 2015
Indian Creek

Since 2010, farmers in the Indian Creek watershed in Illinois have been working together to implement conservation practices and nutrient management strategies to reduce nutrient loading in Indian Creek. Postdoctoral Research Associate Sarah Church led the process of evaluating this watershed project and understanding which social conditions contributed to the project's success. Her findings are presented in the new publication "Indian Creek Watershed Project: Key Takeaways for Success."

In continuing sharing the research regarding the issues of Indian Creek Purdue Extension's Aaron Doenges produced two videos focusing on two key reasons for the project's success, the people involved with the project's steering committee and the partnerships formed with agribusinesses. 

In the first video, "Partnerships and People", Terry Bachtold of the Livingston County Soil and Water Conservation District, Chad Watts of CTIC, and several others involved in the watershed project, talk about how crucial forming a locally-led steering committee was to the project's success. Partnerships led to friendships as the group worked together to make a difference in their watershed. 

In the second video​, "Partnerships with Agribusinesses", agronomists Harold Reetz, Marion Shier, and other people involved in the watershed project discuss the importance of getting retailers like Mike Trainor involved. Agribusinesses are trusted farmer advisors, provide unique insights, and offer valuable support that can strengthen watershed projects.

"Indian Creek Watershed Project: Takeaways for Success" and the accompanying videos can provide watershed and conservation organizations with valuable insights for their own watershed projects. Moreover, farmers and retailers are encouraged read this publication, view these videos and consider becoming part of something bigger. As members of a watershed join together, economic and environmental improvements can take place.

Resources:
Indian Creek Watershed Project: Takeaways for Success​ - The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Indian Creek Watershed Project - Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC)
Indian Creek Watershed Project - Reetz Agronomics
Indian Creek Watershed Project Presentation - United States Environmental Protection Agency
A Watershed Approach - United States Environmental Protection Agency

Sarah P. Church, Post Doctoral Research Associate
Purdue University, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

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